Reminder: Alan Braverman, Catherine Gigante-Brown, Omayma Khayat, Anthony Vigorito at Park Plaza Restaurant, Sat, 10/28 at 2:30 p.m.

Poetry Grows in Brooklyn Heights 2017

Brownstone Poets Inspiring Brooklyn Since 2005

Reminder: Brownstone Poets presents

Saturday, October 28 at 2:30 p.m.

Alan Braverman

Catherine Gigante-Brown

Omayma Khayat

Anthony Vigorito


@ Park Plaza Restaurant

220 Cadman Plaza West near Clark St.and Pineapple Walk

Brooklyn, NY 11201

718 – 596 – 5900


Subways:

Take the A or C to High Street, 2 or 3 to Clark Street

R to Court Street

 


4 or  to 5 Borough Hall

For more directions:

Please check the MTA’s “The Weekender” for all transit updates.

http://web.mta.info/weekender.html


$5 Donation – plus Food/Drink – Open-Mic

Curated by Patricia Carragon

 

FACEBOOK INVITE:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1933290263617887/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22feed_story_type%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&pnref=story

pcarragon@gmail.com
brownstonepoets.blogspot.com/
patriciacarragon8.wordpress.com/

en-gb.facebook.com/people/Brownstone-Poets/541314712

Bios:

 

Alan Braverman is a Brooklyn poet, artist, and, a retired teacher. Nine years ago at Ken Siegelman’s Poetry Outreach, Ken inspired Alan to write again. Sadly, Ken Siegelman passed away in 2009.  Subsequently, Alan was featured at the BookMark Bard, Barnes and Noble, and the Park Slope Library with Anthony Vigorito, the MC; and Evie Ivy’s Open Mic, at the Green Pavilion. Evie Ivy published two of his poems, in The Venetian Hour, Dinner With the Muse, Volume II, and one poem in Patricia Carragon’s Brownstone Poets Anthology. Alan has illustrated a book of poems by Anthony Vigorito, the author of several books of poetry.

 

Catherine Gigante-Brown’s works of fiction, nonfiction and poetry have appeared in publications as diverse as Ravishly, Essence, American Gardener, Huffington Post Woman and Dakota Outdoors. She co-authored two biographies for Prometheus Books. Her short stories appear in women’s fiction anthologies. Several of her screenplays have been produced by independent film companies.Her novels The El, Different Drummer and The Bells of Brooklyn are published by Volossal, and she is currently working on a musical version of Different Drummer with a director and composer. Brown was born and bred in Brooklyn, where she still lives with her husband and son.

 

Omayma Khayat is a poet, a mother of three young children, and a project manager. In her writing, she often explores the tug and pull of her identity as an American of Lebanese origin, and her Muslim faith. Her poetry speaks through various levels of truths; they are a way for her to search for her part in the world, to know where she belongs. With a cultural aspect, taking from being totally culturally confused she bleeds her soul onto paper to find her mark in the world. Feeling at times stuck between two worlds, her poetry explores the tug and pull of her identity. Her poems, at times, are the legend to a map, an exploration of countless journeys throughout her existence to find the place where she belongs. Her search of where the X is, where her treasure is buried, where her identity is defined.

 

Anthony Vigorito, a lifelong Brooklynite, attended St. Athanasius elementary school, Lafayette High School, SUNY Fredonia, and Brooklyn College. He is retired from the Department of Education after having served 30 years as a special education teacher. Anthony was mentored by and worked closely with Ken Siegelman, Brooklyn’s third Poet Laureate for the past ten years, assisting in the implementation of Brooklyn Poetry Outreach, the Ken Siegelman and Marty Markowitz creation, from its inception until now. He sat on the committee to select the new poet laureate, and is currently writing, reading, supporting poets, advocating literacy, encouraging everyone to write, chronicle, diary, and journal. Anthony is the author of 4 volumes of poetry: Pier 48 South Brooklyn, Clef & Palettes, 17 West, and Seeing in 17: Art Haiku.

Alan Braverman, Catherine Gigante-Brown, Omayma Khayat, Anthony Vigorito at Park Plaza Restaurant, Sat, 10/28 at 2:30 p.m.

Poetry Grows in Brooklyn Heights 2017

Brownstone Poets Inspiring Brooklyn Since 2005

Brownstone Poets presents

Saturday, October 28 at 2:30 p.m.

Alan Braverman

Catherine Gigante-Brown

Omayma Khayat

Anthony Vigorito


@ Park Plaza Restaurant

220 Cadman Plaza West near Clark St.and Pineapple Walk

Brooklyn, NY 11201

718 – 596 – 5900


Subways:

Take the A or C to High Street, 2 or 3 to Clark Street

R to Court Street

 


4 or  to 5 Borough Hall

For more directions:

Please check the MTA’s “The Weekender” for all transit updates.

http://web.mta.info/weekender.html


$5 Donation – plus Food/Drink – Open-Mic

Curated by Patricia Carragon

 

FACEBOOK INVITE:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1933290263617887/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22feed_story_type%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&pnref=story

pcarragon@gmail.com
brownstonepoets.blogspot.com/
patriciacarragon8.wordpress.com/

en-gb.facebook.com/people/Brownstone-Poets/541314712

Bios:

 

Alan Braverman is a Brooklyn poet, artist, and, a retired teacher. Nine years ago at Ken Siegelman’s Poetry Outreach, Ken inspired Alan to write again. Sadly, Ken Siegelman passed away in 2009.  Subsequently, Alan was featured at the BookMark Bard, Barnes and Noble, and the Park Slope Library with Anthony Vigorito, the MC; and Evie Ivy’s Open Mic, at the Green Pavilion. Evie Ivy published two of his poems, in The Venetian Hour, Dinner With the Muse, Volume II, and one poem in Patricia Carragon’s Brownstone Poets Anthology. Alan has illustrated a book of poems by Anthony Vigorito, the author of several books of poetry.

 

Catherine Gigante-Brown’s works of fiction, nonfiction and poetry have appeared in publications as diverse as Ravishly, Essence, American Gardener, Huffington Post Woman and Dakota Outdoors. She co-authored two biographies for Prometheus Books. Her short stories appear in women’s fiction anthologies. Several of her screenplays have been produced by independent film companies.Her novels The El, Different Drummer and The Bells of Brooklyn are published by Volossal, and she is currently working on a musical version of Different Drummer with a director and composer. Brown was born and bred in Brooklyn, where she still lives with her husband and son.

 

Omayma Khayat is a poet, a mother of three young children, and a project manager. In her writing, she often explores the tug and pull of her identity as an American of Lebanese origin, and her Muslim faith. Her poetry speaks through various levels of truths; they are a way for her to search for her part in the world, to know where she belongs. With a cultural aspect, taking from being totally culturally confused she bleeds her soul onto paper to find her mark in the world. Feeling at times stuck between two worlds, her poetry explores the tug and pull of her identity. Her poems, at times, are the legend to a map, an exploration of countless journeys throughout her existence to find the place where she belongs. Her search of where the X is, where her treasure is buried, where her identity is defined.

 

Anthony Vigorito, a lifelong Brooklynite, attended St. Athanasius elementary school, Lafayette High School, SUNY Fredonia, and Brooklyn College. He is retired from the Department of Education after having served 30 years as a special education teacher. Anthony was mentored by and worked closely with Ken Siegelman, Brooklyn’s third Poet Laureate for the past ten years, assisting in the implementation of Brooklyn Poetry Outreach, the Ken Siegelman and Marty Markowitz creation, from its inception until now. He sat on the committee to select the new poet laureate, and is currently writing, reading, supporting poets, advocating literacy, encouraging everyone to write, chronicle, diary, and journal. Anthony is the author of 4 volumes of poetry: Pier 48 South Brooklyn, Clef & Palettes, 17 West, and Seeing in 17: Art Haiku.

BKLYNER: Patricia Carragon on Innocence & Bath Beach

Happy That BKLYNER, a local online newsletter for Brooklyn, has posted an interview of me for Thursday, June 21, 2017. The link is below:
I’m getting excited about reading for Anthony Vigorito’s readings, Tom Kane’s BookMark Bards on Tuesday, June 6 at 7 p.m.
Patricia Carragon is a poet from Bath Beach who loves cupcakes, cats, and haiku, and as a child wrote and illustrated a make-believe newspaper. It was her witty pitches for her Brunch ‘n Fun social activities at St. Bartholomew’s Church in Manhattan, though, that led to a life of poetry.
Patricia is also the host of the Brownstone Poets reading series and edits its annual anthology.  Her book of poetry, titled Innocence has just been published in paperback, and she will be doing a reading at the Bookmark Shoppe in Bay Ridge on Tuesday, June 6 at 7 p.m.
Can you tell us about what prompted you to write ‘Innocence’? Is it autobiographical?
Several of the poems in ‘Innocence’ are based on personal experience—the expectations that withered over the years. No child or adult should be the victim of bullying, ridicule, and loneliness. But it is also about the triumph of the human spirit over hardship. In spite of what has happened to me, I still retain innocence for agape love, peace of mind, sunshine, and the rainbow after the storm.
 
What would you like readers to know about ‘Innocence’ before they pick it up?
‘Innocence’ is about how reality burns the “cookie-cutter” expectations of childhood and the “success stories” of adulthood. In several poems, reality is the extension of unescapable nightmares—the ones that hit you in the gut. But reality is also the source for inspiration, humor, hope, dignity, and joy. My words understand the complexities of struggle—words that many readers could relate to.
Your first book of poetry published in 2005. What did it feel like to publish your first collection, and how has your work changed since that first book?
Holding my first book, ‘Journey to the Center of My Mind’ (Rogue Scholars Press) brought joy and satisfaction. I was a newcomer to the literary world and was gaining acceptance among peers. My writing style has evolved over the years. I’ve learned to tighten my sentences and make the flow less jarring. Seems as though my style changes every five years. In ‘Innocence,’ I’ve included two re-edited poems, “Humoresque” and “Dead Flower,” from my first book.
What is your writing process for poetry and short fiction — Do you sit down to write everyday or when the mood strikes?
My process for writing is whenever the muse strikes. It could happen anywhere—on the subway or before I go to bed. If I don’t write down my thoughts immediately, my ‘trains of thought’ will travel to some undisclosed destination. LOL!
What are your greatest struggles as an artist? What about your greatest moment of success? 
My greatest struggles are getting my writing in the best shape possible for publication and receiving rejection letters. I’m constantly editing, in search for perfection. I read my work at workshops and readings. I value the feedback from other writers. This is necessary for fine-tuning my work. But it’s tough when those notorious rejection letters from literary journals hit my inbox. It’s part of the process of being a writer—you win one day and lose the next.
My greatest moment of success is when I see my work reach fruition. It could be in its completion, publication, or appreciation.
When (and how) did you know that you wanted to be a writer? Is there a specific moment that you started calling yourself a writer? 
As a child, I created and illustrated a club newspaper. However, I wasn’t encouraged to write until the early ’90s when I wrote witty pitches for my ‘Brunch ’n Fun’ social activities at St. Bartholomew’s Church. One friend encouraged me to explore my literary muse. Another saw poetic resonance in my eulogy for Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.
Since you have an upcoming reading, can you tell us what it feels like to read your work to a live audience?
I like to come prepared. If the feature is ten or twenty minutes long, I would time myself accordingly—usually reading for about a few minutes under my time. I’d rather give those minutes to the open readers. I read a variety of work and use different moods, whether it be prose, poetry, haiku, flash fiction, et al. I want to engage my audience. No “poet voice,” please!
Tell us about your history with Bensonhurst/Bath Beach — when did you move there and why? 
I moved here on June 30, 2014. I needed to be closer to my Brownstone Poets reading series in Brooklyn Heights and my Brooklynite friends. Flushing was too far and Astoria was getting too pricy. You can’t beat the rents in this section of Brooklyn!
What do you love most about the neighborhood? What do you wish you could change?
I love the diversity of the neighborhood. Where can you find cannoli, borsht, dim sum, falafel, rice and beans, and gyros within walking distance? However, we do need more Internet cafés.
Does living in Bensonhurst/Bath Beach affect your work as an artist?
The everyday life in the neighborhood is poetry in motion. Poetry and art are everywhere. A haiku could happen while standing on the 18th Avenue D platform. Simple activities inspire, as well as the backyards, sidewalks, subways, trees, sky, and local cats. I always walk around with a notebook and iPhone.
What is your favorite neighborhood spot? 
Shore Promenade. Now with weather getting warmer, a morning schlep to the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge would be as invigorating as going to the gym. Great for photography as well.
You can hear her read from the new collection, Innocence, on Tuesday, June 6 at 7pm, at the Bookmark Shoppe in Bay Ridge.

Two Brooklyn Poets Alan Braverman and Anthony Vigorito Read at Cafe Dada Tues, 4/16 at 7 p.m.

Brownstone Poets presents Alan Braverman and Anthony Vigorito on Tuesday, April 16 at 7 p.m. at Café Dada.  Enjoy the Old World ambiance in Park Slope that’s near several subways.  Feast on French-Hungarian cuisine and delectable pastries.  Relax with some wine or beer, a cup of coffee or tea while listening to great poetry. There’s an open mic as well. Poetry does grow in Park Slope, Brooklyn.

Brownstone Poets presents:

Alan Braverman and Anthony Vigorito

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Starts at 7 p.m. – Sign up at 6:45 p.m.

Café Dada

57 Seventh Avenue (at the corner of Lincoln Place)
Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY 11217
718-622-2800

Subways:

2 or 3 to Grand Army Plaza
B or Q to Seventh Avenue
F or G to Seventh Avenue (9th Street)
R to Union Street, plus a bit of a walk.

http://www.hopstop.com/

$4 donation + food/drink – Open-Mic

Curated by Patricia Carragon

pcarragon@gmail.com

BIOS:
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Alan Braverman, Brooklyn poet, painter, and  retired NYC schoolteacher, began writing poetry at a Kansas Christian College. Escaping the draft, this college became his sanctuary (although he is Jewish). He wrote controversial poems that were published in the school newspaper until they were censured. After college, Alan stopped writing. Five years ago, he attended an open mic at the Park Slope Barnes and Noble. Ken Siegelman, Brooklyn’s Poet Laureate, hosted the readings. He inspired Alan to write again. He has been featured at three venues, and has illustrated a book of poems, by Anthony Vigorito (who is the current MC at the Barnes and Noble reading).

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Brooklyn poet Anthony Vigorito was mentored by Ken Siegelman and has authored three chapbooks, Pier 48 South Brooklyn, Clefs & Palettes, and 17 West.  He is the host of Ken Siegelman’s Poetry Outreach at the Park Slope Barnes and Noble and Tom Kane’s Boulevard Bards at Boulevard Books Café in Dyker Heights, Brooklyn.